ERA INTERVENTION AT THE UNESCO CONFERENCE OF BAMAKO

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Promoting an Open Language for P2P Transnational Linguistic Comunication
by Lapo Orlandi – “Esperanto” Radikala Asocio


Abstract.

When Jules Verne, by the end of his life started to wonder how the global communication problem would have been solved in the future, he thought to a neutral linguistic technology, rather than to some sophisticated ‘speaking machine’, and turned his attention to, Esperanto, the Open Language. Strangely enough, writing his last novel, “Voyage d’etudes”, he imagined that the most advanced world region in the experimentation of such a human technology would have precisely been Africa!

On the other hand, the experience – and the failures – of the linguistic policies followed by several countries and International Organisations (to protect and foster regional or national languages or to multiply the offer of languages and of tools of support for multilingualism) show that probably – once again! – the “Great Magician” was right.

If the problem is the raise of the request for simplification in the market of global linguistic communication the answer has to be primarily given in the field of the demand and not of the offer. The model shall be the success of the spontaneous market of Open Software and Peer to Peer providers applied to the linguistic field, rather than forms of already unsuccessful protectionism.

Studies conducted at national and at the European Union level show that not only the Open Language Esperanto, being neutral and at the same time easier to learn than any ethnical language, allows to internationally affirm the universal right to Peer to Peer transnational linguistic communication, safeguarding cultural and linguistic diversity, but it also can be efficiently used to reduce the costs of multilingualism if used as a bridge standard language in fields such as both human and machine translation and interpretation or even international information system production.

This message was edited by: %s on %s LapoOrlandi, May 24, 2005 – 11:23 PM[addsig]




2 Comments

Lapo Orlandi
Lapo Orlandi

<STRONG>Promoting an Open Language for P2P Transnational Linguistic Comunication</STRONG><BR><STRONG>by Lapo Orlandi – “Esperanto” Radikala Asocio</STRONG><BR><B></B><BR><B></B><BR><B>Abstract.</B><BR><B></B><BR><B>When Jules Verne, by the end of his life started to wonder how the global communication problem would have been solved in the future, he thought to a neutral linguistic technology, rather than to some sophisticated ‘speaking machine’, and turned his attention to, Esperanto, the Open Language. Strangely enough, writing his last novel, “Voyage d’etudes”, he imagined that the most advanced world region in the experimentation of such a human technology would have precisely been Africa!</B><BR><B></B><BR><B>On the other hand, the experience – and the failures – of the linguistic policies followed by several countries and International Organisations (to protect and foster regional or national languages or to multiply the offer of languages and of tools of support for multilingualism) show that probably - once again! - the “Great Magician” was right.</B><BR><B></B><BR><B>If the problem is the raise of the request for simplification in the market of global linguistic communication the answer has to be primarily given in the field of the demand and not of the offer. The model shall be the success of the spontaneous market of Open Software and Peer to Peer providers applied to the linguistic field, rather than forms of already unsuccessful protectionism. </B><BR><B></B><BR><B>Studies conducted at national and at the European Union level show that not only the Open Language Esperanto, being neutral and at the same time easier to learn than any ethnical language, allows to internationally affirm the universal right to Peer to Peer transnational linguistic communication, safeguarding cultural and linguistic diversity, but it also can be efficiently used to reduce the costs of multilingualism if used as a bridge standard language in fields such as both human and machine translation and interpretation or even international information system production. </B><BR><A href="http://aygum.com/"></A><!-- editby --><br /><br /><i>This message was edited by: %s on %s LapoOrlandi, May 24, 2005 - 11:23 PM</i><!-- end editby -->[addsig]

Lapo Orlandi
Lapo Orlandi

<STRONG>Promoting an Open Language for P2P Transnational Linguistic Comunication</STRONG><BR><STRONG>by Lapo Orlandi – “Esperanto” Radikala Asocio</STRONG><BR><B></B><BR><B></B><BR><B>Abstract.</B><BR><B></B><BR><B>When Jules Verne, by the end of his life started to wonder how the global communication problem would have been solved in the future, he thought to a neutral linguistic technology, rather than to some sophisticated ‘speaking machine’, and turned his attention to, Esperanto, the Open Language. Strangely enough, writing his last novel, “Voyage d’etudes”, he imagined that the most advanced world region in the experimentation of such a human technology would have precisely been Africa!</B><BR><B></B><BR><B>On the other hand, the experience – and the failures – of the linguistic policies followed by several countries and International Organisations (to protect and foster regional or national languages or to multiply the offer of languages and of tools of support for multilingualism) show that probably - once again! - the “Great Magician” was right.</B><BR><B></B><BR><B>If the problem is the raise of the request for simplification in the market of global linguistic communication the answer has to be primarily given in the field of the demand and not of the offer. The model shall be the success of the spontaneous market of Open Software and Peer to Peer providers applied to the linguistic field, rather than forms of already unsuccessful protectionism. </B><BR><B></B><BR><B>Studies conducted at national and at the European Union level show that not only the Open Language Esperanto, being neutral and at the same time easier to learn than any ethnical language, allows to internationally affirm the universal right to Peer to Peer transnational linguistic communication, safeguarding cultural and linguistic diversity, but it also can be efficiently used to reduce the costs of multilingualism if used as a bridge standard language in fields such as both human and machine translation and interpretation or even international information system production. </B><BR><A href="http://aygum.com/"></A><!-- editby --><br /><br /><i>This message was edited by: %s on %s LapoOrlandi, May 24, 2005 - 11:23 PM</i><!-- end editby -->[addsig]

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